Our resident adventurer and survival expert Meg Hine, tells us why she thinks adventure films inspire us all to explore the great outdoors.       ‘Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home; that wildness is a necessity’   John Muir.   Through the medium of adventure films we are re-connecting to the wild world in a new and accessible way. Through the eye of the camera lens and the imagination of the director and producers, the wilderness has become accessible to all. Via our favourite shows we are exposed to remote tribes people, sharing a tiny snapshot into their culture, so different to our own. We accompany adventurers on exciting journeys and we learn about plants, animals and insects that are at risk of extinction due to the actions of man. We’ve visited the depths of the sea where we’ve met fantastically weird creatures, we’ve summited the freezing heights of Everest and Motorbiked across the dry heat of the Sahara.  The role of adventure film is evolving in our lives, more and more people are watching and to meet this need, more people are making adventure shows. Why is this? Where does this need to watch nature in action stem from? Why do we need to watch people pushing their limits in remote places?  I believe the answer is simple yet complex. I truly believe that our human brains are not as modernised as we imagine. Underneath the stresses and materialism of modern day life lies a primitive animal brain. A brain that evolved over thousands of years to maximise survival in wilderness settings. A brain that developed coping mechanisms to survive predation, to improvise hunting tools, the brain of a herd creature, a creature who is designed to work with other similar creatures to further the human race. A creature that ran wild and free, hunting, gathering, herding, constantly moving and always attuned to the wilderness around it. Our brains are fundamentally wild. By watching adventure shows on TV, we feed the animalistic recesses of our brain and a long forgotten emotion is stirred. An ember awakened glows and is slowly fanned to flame. A fundamental need for wilderness places and to run, unhindered through wild terrain, a yearning, which longs to be satiated, a feeling of something missing in life.  Adventure film then plays the role of catalyst for many to set out on their own exploration of nature. It inspires, it educates and it does not discriminate. The wild is accessible to all who choose to enter on whatever level.  Meg. 

Our resident adventurer and survival expert Meg Hine, tells us why she thinks adventure films inspire us all to explore the great outdoors. 

‘Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home; that wildness is a necessity’ John Muir.

Through the medium of adventure films we are re-connecting to the wild world in a new and accessible way. Through the eye of the camera lens and the imagination of the director and producers, the wilderness has become accessible to all. Via our favourite shows we are exposed to remote tribes people, sharing a tiny snapshot into their culture, so different to our own. We accompany adventurers on exciting journeys and we learn about plants, animals and insects that are at risk of extinction due to the actions of man. We’ve visited the depths of the sea where we’ve met fantastically weird creatures, we’ve summited the freezing heights of Everest and Motorbiked across the dry heat of the Sahara.

The role of adventure film is evolving in our lives, more and more people are watching and to meet this need, more people are making adventure shows. Why is this? Where does this need to watch nature in action stem from? Why do we need to watch people pushing their limits in remote places?

I believe the answer is simple yet complex. I truly believe that our human brains are not as modernised as we imagine. Underneath the stresses and materialism of modern day life lies a primitive animal brain. A brain that evolved over thousands of years to maximise survival in wilderness settings. A brain that developed coping mechanisms to survive predation, to improvise hunting tools, the brain of a herd creature, a creature who is designed to work with other similar creatures to further the human race. A creature that ran wild and free, hunting, gathering, herding, constantly moving and always attuned to the wilderness around it. Our brains are fundamentally wild. By watching adventure shows on TV, we feed the animalistic recesses of our brain and a long forgotten emotion is stirred. An ember awakened glows and is slowly fanned to flame. A fundamental need for wilderness places and to run, unhindered through wild terrain, a yearning, which longs to be satiated, a feeling of something missing in life.

Adventure film then plays the role of catalyst for many to set out on their own exploration of nature. It inspires, it educates and it does not discriminate. The wild is accessible to all who choose to enter on whatever level.

Meg.